Three Ways to Boost Joint Flexibility

What’s up, y’all! Go shorty, it’s my birthday! Getting older in life means a lot of changes in your body. Every now and then, I get aches and pains just like the next person. Sometimes things start cracking and bending more than they should. I know some friends and family members that suffer from osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis. Osteoarthritis is a disease where the prevalence increases with age. The total annual cost in the United States is almost $65 billion for treating arthritis. Some symptoms of osteoarthritis include pain, reduced function, stiffness, and joint instability. Some treatment options include muscle-strengthening exercises, weight loss, and in some cases, joint replacement surgery. But there are some preventive measures that may be taken in terms of diet. When I get certain types of joint pains, particularly in my knees and elbows, I definitely like to eat my usual anti-inflammatory foods like turmeric and pineapple. Here are some other foods that may help:

 

Capsaicin

I wrote a little about capsaicin here. Some studies indicate that capsaicin is effective at relieving joint inflammation associated with arthritis and other conditions such as pruritus. Some research indicates that capsaicin may repress the growth of lung cancer cells. What’s more, capsaicin has been beneficial in treating conditions such as cluster headaches, diabetic neuropathy, and rheumatic diseases. Here’s a great DIY capsaicin rub recipe (please omit the beeswax and use more vegan-friendly waxes like candelilla wax) but feel free to improvise and use your own carrier and essential oils.

 

 

 

 

Red grapes

I grew up watching my father and my brother gorge on grapes. Red grapes were a favorite in my household because they were more accessible in our local market. Admittedly, I am not really a fan of grapes on a regular basis, however, I do get my fix on every now and then. Grapes have nutrients such as vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, folate, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, and copper. Grapes also contains boron, a nutrient that aid in strong bones. Further, red grapes contain strong antioxidants such as anthocyanins that have antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. But what makes red grapes so special is resveratrol, an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic compound (also found in red wine so feel free to enjoy a glass if you must 😊). In fact, several studies indicate that resveratrol may prevent bone cartilage loss associated with arthritis. For instance, a 2005 study found that resveratrol protected cartilage against the development of osteoarthritis. More so, some animal studies show that resveratrol may reduce the risk of certain types of cancer including colon and skin cancer, prevent atherosclerosis, improve serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and decrease low-density lipoprotein levels.

 

 

Cherries

My husband is a huge cherry fanatic—sorbet, pies, you name it. I love to indulge my cherry craving when I need a hit of something really sweet, juicy, and luscious like a big cherry turnover. Cherries have vitamin A and C, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, and calcium. And like red grapes, cherries are full of those antioxidant anthocyanins and flavonoids such as quercetin and kaempferol. But cherries may alleviate arthritis and gout-related pain. A 2005 study found that other compounds in cherries like cyanidin decreased the inflammation associated with arthritis. And a 2003 study showed that cherry consumption reduced the uric acid levels in gout patients. In addition, a 2010 study found that cherry juice decreased exercise-induced inflammation and oxidative stress in runners. I found this yummy cherry blend smoothie that I highly recommend.

Just a little note: I am making a few changes to the blog and scaling back on a few things so I can highlight more products that might be helpful to you busy people out there. Enjoy this holiday weekend!

Advertisements