Five Fortifiers for Supporting Your Immune System

I hope that many of you have been out and about slaying this summer! It’s been a little schizo with the weather. One minute, it’s sizzling hot and the next, it’s rainy and cool (I actually prefer a little coolness to walk around without the sweatiness but that’s just me 😉). Anywho, my son and I did a little day trip to a museum in the city and had a blast. But a few days later, my nose was stuffy and I was constantly blowing it like a trumpet. My husband said, “Looks like you have a cold.” What the hell! In July?! Who catches a cold in summer! My immunity has been a little comprised lately. Generally, your immune system acts to protect the host from infectious agents in the environment like bacteria, fungi, and viruses. But the immune system may be impaired by factors including short-term and chronic stress, aging, and poor nutrition. Truth be told, I have had some additional stressors lately in my life that I’m learning how to manage slowly but surely. Meditation and journaling has helped me tremendously. There are times when I feel angry or sad and I accept it; I don’t try to fight it off as I instinctively want to do.

Some evidence suggests that deficiencies in nutrients such as vitamin A, C, E, zinc, and selenium may also play a pivotal role in immune function. So there are some foods that I bone up on to help boost my immunity. Some of them are as follows:

Red onions

As a young 20-something carnivore, I went through this weird phase where I would put caramelized onions on everything like tuna sandwiches or grilled chicken. I have no freaking clue why I did that. Don’t judge me! Eventually, I outgrew that little scenario. Recently, I have slowly started integrating red onions back into my life. Just a little bit here and there on my veggie burgers and pasta dishes just to add some zing. Again, just a little bit. Onions contain vitamins C, E, B vitamins, potassium, calcium, and selenium. Red onions have a higher concentration of nutrients such as potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium than yellow onions. Vitamin C is crucial to the immune system because it prevents oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA in the body that can lead to the development of chronic conditions including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Also, vitamin C regenerates vitamin E when it becomes oxidized by free radicals. Some animal studies indicate that selenium deficiency decreases the body’s ability to fight off viral infections such as influenza and Keshan disease. Furthermore, low selenium levels have been associated with illnesses such as thyroid dysfunction, depression, and sperm abnormalities. In addition, this plant has strong antioxidant properties because it has flavonoids like catechin, kaempferol, myricetin, and quercetin. Quercetin protects against low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (the bad cholesterol) and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. I decided to do my own spin on this side dish of creamy cauliflower that is lightly topped with red onions for an extra punch.

Peaches

Peaches are an occasional treat for me, mostly if it’s in season or something like that. But when it is available, honey!!! Grilled peaches on top of ice cream—LOVE!! Okay, let me turn off my greedy button and get to it. Peaches are a good source of beta-carotene, the precursor to vitamin A. Some studies have shown that beta-carotene enhances the immune system by increasing the number of T-helper cells and natural killer cells, which are instrumental in terms of immune response to infected cells. Beta-carotene also has cancer-fighting potential because of its antioxidant ability to combat single-oxygen free radicals that may lead to conditions such as skin and lung cancer. What’s more, beta-carotene is converted to retinol that is needed for optimal vision. And this fruit has other nutrients like vitamin C, potassium, calcium, and phosphorus. As I said before, peaches are great on top of rich desserts but sometimes I need to keep it light and fresh with a summer salad.

 

Carrots

Carrots are king when it comes to beta-carotene because it is one of the best sources of this nutrient. As such, it has been reported that carrot intake has immuno-enhancing properties and has a protective effect against conditions such as stroke, high blood pressure, osteoporosis, cataracts, arthritis, heart diseases, bronchial asthma, and urinary tract infection. This antioxidant veggie is also loaded with other phytonutrients such as polyphenols like caffeic acid that have antimutagenic and antitumor properties. In addition, it contains dietary fiber and nutrients like vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folic acid, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. My son eats carrots all the time so we always have it in the house. I tend to snack on carrots with almond butter from time to time, but every now and then I fancy it up by roasting it with a dash of thyme and agave nectar.

Mango

My family is Jamaican, so mangoes were always around our house when I was growing up. And you didn’t eat it all chopped up and pretty. You held that sucker in your hand, chomped right into the skin, peeled the skin off, then slurped on the juicy, succulent fibrous strands until you reached the seed. Yep, yardies are hardcore my friend! Anywho, mangoes are rich in immuno-enhancing vitamin C and E, as well as essential nutrients such as potassium and copper. This fruit is high in antioxidants because it contains close to 25 different carotenoids including beta-carotene. Mangoes have polyphenols like quercetin, caffeic acid, and catechin. But the fruit has its own unique phenolic compounds such as mangiferin. All of which show anticarcinogenic, antiatherosclerotic, antimutagenic, and angiogenesis activity against degenerative diseases. Some studies suggest that mangiferin may be effective in treating heart disease. And it has been reported that mango consumption may reduce the risk of prostate and skin cancers. I love to slather mango salsa in my wraps and salads, but when it’s hot, mango salsa on a veggie burger is promising too.

Brazil nuts

Brazil nuts are definitely new to my repertoire. If you love peanuts, these nuts are for you, despite the large, weird, triangular shape. Brazil nuts taste the same—trust! Brazil nuts have protein, fiber, vitamin E, vitamin B6, thiamin, niacin, calcium, iron, potassium, copper, and magnesium. But Brazil nuts are also the best plant-based source of that immune-boosting antioxidant selenium. It has been reported that one Brazil nut provides 160 percent of the US Recommended Daily Allowance of selenium, which may lower the risk of conditions such as prostate, liver, and lung cancer. And Brazil nut consumption has been associated with lowering blood cholesterol levels. Please note that Brazil nuts do contain barium and radium, which are potentially toxic in large amounts. The best way to enjoy Brazil nuts is mixed with other nuts like cashews and almonds. Moderation is always the way to go.

 

So these of some of the foods that I like to load up on when my immune system is out of wack. What are some of the ones you eat?

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